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Attractions in San Marco area, Venice

Basilica di San Giorgio Maggiore

San Giorgio Maggiore is a 16th century Benedictine church on the island of the same name in Venice, designed by Andrea Palladio and built between 1566 and 1610. The church is a basilica in the classical renaissance style and its brilliant white marble gleams above the blue water of the lagoon opposite the Piazzetta.

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Basilica di San Marco

The Basilica di San Marco is the most famous of the city's churches and one of the best known examples of Byzantine architecture. It lies at the eastern end of the Piazza San Marco, adjacent and connected to the Doge's Palace. Originally it was the chapel of the Doge.

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Campo Santo Stefano

Campo San Stefano, also known as Campo Francesco Morosini (this is the name of the 11th century Doge who once lived here), is located in the Sestiere of San Marco and is one of the largest places in Venice. It is bordered by the homonymous gothic church with remnants of gothic frescoes. Apart from a fine late gothic portal on the Campiello San Stefano, the church features a singular wooden ship's keel roof and several baroque altars.

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Chiesa di San Moisè

The Church of San Moisè in Venice is dedicated to Moses, like the Byzantines, the Venetians tended to canonise Old Testament prophets. It also honours Moisè Venier, who paid for it to be rebuilt in the 9th century. The elaborate Baroque facade is covered in carvings.

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Chiesa di Santa Maria del Giglio

The Church of Santa Maria del Giglio, whose name translates into St. Mary of the Lily referring to the flower classically depicted as being presented by the Angel Gabriel during the Annunciation, is commonly known as Santa Maria Zobenigo after the Jubanico family who founded it in the 9th century.

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Chiesa di Santo Stefano

The Church of Santo Stefano ( St. Stephen) is a large church at the northern end of the Campo Santo Stefano in Venice. It was founded in the 13th century, rebuilt in the 14th century and altered again early in the 15th century, when the fine gothic doorway and ship's keel roof were added.

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Museo Correr

The Museo Correr is the civic museum located in the Piazza San Marco, facing the basilica of St. Mark that it partially occupies, and is entered by way of the Napoleonic wing of the bureaucratic buildings, or Procuratie, framing three-quarters of the piazza. The museum offers a fascinating insight into the art and history of Venice.

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Palazzo Ducale

The Palazzo Ducale is a gothic palace that was the residence of the Doge of Venice. Its two most visible façades look towards the Venetian Lagoon and St Mark's Square, or rather the Piazzetta. The Palace is the very symbol of Venice, in St. Mark’s Square, near to the famous Ponte dei Sospiri. Inside, works by great masters as Tintoretto, Veronese, etc.

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Piazza San Marco

St. Mark's Square, located in Venice, is one of the most important Italian squares, renowned throughout the world for its beauty and architectural integrity. It is the only urban area of Venice, which takes the name of the piazza, all other spaces in the form of square are properly defined like campi. It has a trapezoidal shape and is 170 meters long.

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Piazzetta di San Marco

The Piazzetta di San Marco is not part of the Piazza but an adjoining open space connecting the south side of the Piazza to the waterway of the lagoon. The Piazzetta lies between the Doge's Palace on the east and Jacopo Sansovino's Libreria which holds the Biblioteca Marciana on the west.

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Teatro La Fenice

Teatro La Fenice is the opera house in Venice. It is one of the most famous theatres in Europe, the site of many famous operatic premieres. Its name reflects its role in permitting an opera company to "rise from the ashes" despite losing the use of two theatres. Since opening and being named La Fenice, it has burned and been rebuilt twice more.

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Torre dell'Orologio

The St Mark's Clock tower is an early renaissance building on the north side of the Piazza San Marco at the entrance to the Merceria. It comprises a tower, which contains the clock, and lower buildings on each side. Both the tower and the clock date from the 15th century, though the mechanism of the clock has been altered.

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